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Scarsdale Continues To Search For Canada Goose Solution

Scarsdale officials will continue to search for a way to remove Canada geese from the pond near the library.
Scarsdale officials will continue to search for a way to remove Canada geese from the pond near the library. Photo Credit: File

SCARSDALE, N.Y. – Following outrage from animal rights activists around the country, Scarsdale officials will continue to investigate options to remove Canada geese from the pond near the public library.

The village initially planned to contract with the United States Department of Agriculture to exterminate the goose population that befouls the pond with droppings. That decision drew the ire of residents and animal rights groups alike, leading village officials to re-evaluate the plan.

Village Manager Alfred Gatta said officials haven’t made any decision on what to do about the geese, but are looking at other options.

“A few [alternative] options have been brought to our attention that we have not tried or known about before,” he said. “It appears to be reasonable to look at them further.”

Gatta said that the village might attempt to modify the habitat by allowing grass to grow longer, which would make it a less appealing environment for mating. They may also use an OvoControl-G birth control feed for geese. They hope to find a solution by the late spring.

“We’ve tried a number of alternatives in the past and have not been successful to this point,” he said. “I must admit that the animal advocates are committed, impassioned and somewhat effective.”

Members of the community, as well as affiliates with animal rights organizations from around the tri-state area, offered Mayor Miriam Levitt Flisser and Gatta alternative options to deal with their problem at a Jan. 22 Board of Trustees meeting.

They proposed methods such as utilizing border collies, a faux-predatory bird, altering the habitat and using noisemakers.

“That meeting was informative and a benefit to myself and village employees,” Gatta said. “The story that got my attention was the woman from Long Island that witnessed the rounding up, boxing and separation of geese. The crying and honking was very sad to hear.”